Kaya Leaders Launch ‘Kaya na Mazingira’ To Conserve Environment

As the shift in weather patterns is absorbed in the unpredictability of winter and summer seasons takes a toll affecting food production, Kaya leaders from the Coastal region have resolved to protect and conserve the environment.


Kaya leaders at the Coast have launched an initiative named ‘Kaya na Mazingira’ dedicated to planting trees as they push for the conservation of the environment. The leaders have unified and opted to majorly delve into planting exotic and indigenous, mostly traditional, trees.


The elders have further emphasized the essence of protecting around 30 sacred Kaya forests situated along the Kenyan Coast. These forests include; Arabuko Sokoke among the few left segments of the largest known great coastal forests that a decade ago stretched from Somalia to Mozambique.


Kaya na Mazingira once rolled will involve the leaders planting primarily exotic trees that include: neem, mango, coconut, cashew nut, moringa, castor oil, baobab, mkwaju, mkunazi, pawpaw, and guava.


Not forgetting the Mkwaju (tamarind) and Mkunazi (Indian jujube) which are naturalized trees from India brought here centuries ago. This is a move by the elders to collect all their seeds and seedlings from inside the Kaya forests which hold superb specimens of many rare local trees.


An initiative will literally assist in combating climate change impacts, as it seeks to conserve the environment and in turn, save the world from the tremendous climate crises witnessed lately globally.


The emphasis on the planting of traditional trees is an alarming cry that brings reminiscing of the past indigenous forests that were not only beautiful but also provided an incredible habitat for various wildlife types harmoniously.

It’s quite evident that the planted forests are steadily rising in turn replacing the previous natural forests coverage that was high. Showing a deliberate decline in the rates of planting traditional trees as they increasingly become rare declining to extinction bit by bit.

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